Here is a selection of some of our favorite maps of the neighborhood. Some are large files and might take a moment to load.

Alameda Plat Map

Click on the map for a larger image, or to download a copy.

Here’s an early plat map of a portion of the neighborhood, created in 1910 by the Alameda Land Company and used in its original marketing materials. This plat shows the Alameda Park Addition, but clearly misses big chunks of today’s Alameda, which were added in the teens and twenties through new plats known as Pearson’s Addition, the Fremont Addition, Olmstead Park, Irvindale, Dunsmeade and the Miami Addition.

By 1915, at least 900 plats had been filed in Portland, many of which were much smaller than Alameda Park, and all were named by developers searching for an attractive sounding name. While in some areas the plats have retained their distinct personality and name, like Alameda, the identity of many smaller plats in our neighborhood have dissolved into the more commonly used neighborhood name of Alameda. The plat names remain today on title documents and land records for these areas.

You’ll note that many of the lots we know today are shaped differently than in the original plat. But the streets, and the Broadway Streetcar line, are in the right place. This map does not have addresses, but if it did, the addresses would not make much sense to Alamedans today. The entire city was re-addressed in the early 1930s. Click here for an article in the Alameda Stories that sheds light on the “great renumbering” of the 1930s, and the background behind our street names.

Some amazingly detailed fire insurance maps of the neighborhood were drawn up by the Sanborn Company in 1924. Click here for an illustrated article I’ve written about the Sanborn maps and a link to the maps themselves.

Beaumont

I’ve been working on a number of houses in the Beaumont neighborhood recently, so I figured I’d post the 1910 plat map from that neighborhood (below). The image here doesn’t do the survey justice, it’s quite a nice piece of work. The shaded lots are those that have been purchased.

beaumont-plat.jpg

Click on the map for a larger image, or to download a copy.

Olmstead Park

olmstead-park-plat-1909.jpg

Click on the map for a larger image, or to download a copy.

Here’s the cadastral map from 1909 showing the Olmstead Park plat. This roughly five-block square area is north of the Alameda Ridge and tucks in under the southeast corner of Alameda Park. Today this part of the neighborhood is clearly considered part of the Alameda District. Out on the ground even in 1911, these two brand new districts were indistinguishable, interwoven by the same streets, the same water, gas and sewer mains, and many of the same architects and builders who were beginning to populate this area with homes. For more information, see the post about Olmstead Park.

City of Portland Real Estate Map, 1906

Click on the map for a larger image, or to download a copy.

Alameda does not yet appear on this map. The location of today’s neighborhood is in the southwest quarter of Section 24. Irvington is in place, with NE 24th Avenue as its eastern boundary. There are several nearby subdivisions showing that were never built. A high resolution copy of this map is available to be downloaded from the City of Portland Archives.

14 Responses to “The Maps”

  1. Jon Wood Says:

    Greetings,

    You have an interesting site.

    Do you know if Alameda was once referred to as ‘Gravel Hill’, or the ‘Highlands’? I looked through several weeks of the Oregonian from 8/2/1898 to 9/8/1898 and read about a fire on, or visible from Gravel Hill, and/ or the Highlands, but no street address.

    The article was one short paragraph. It mentioned some names that I didn’t write down and don’t recall. I wondered if the hill or the ‘Highlands’ might be a previous set of names for Alameda because the article said something about Sullivan’s Gulch, either that the fire was extinguished with water from there, or that people took refuge there.

    I’ve read that Alameda Hill was formed by gravel left by floods (Bretz?), so I wondered if Alameda might be the Gravel Hill referred to in the article.

    Thank you,

    Jon Wood

  2. Doug Says:

    Hi Jon.

    Thanks for stopping by for a visit. I am intrigued to know more about the article you read. Did you by chance make a copy or do you have the date and page?

    Yes, Gravel Hill was the name of the high point at today’s NE 33rd and Fremont. For many years there was a gravel pit of sorts on the southwest corner of that intersection which was also used as a garbage dump. There would have been a great view from that spot out across the flats below, which were populated by several small farmsteads and orchards.

    I’ve not heard of the term “the highlands” in reference to the Alameda ridge, but it could be. The newspaper story might shed light on that: was the view off toward the fire at the highlands? Maybe that refers to the ridgeline we think of today as Forest Park, also called the Tualatin Mountains. Hmm. Check out the article I’ve written about the Pearson Farm, which actually refers to a forest fire just adjacent to Gravel Hill.

    Yes, you’re absolutely correct about the geology.

    -Doug

  3. Tony Jenkins Says:

    Doug, could you shed some light as to why and when the western portion of Alameda Park was separated off and made part of Sabin? The area is west of NE 23rd and north of The Alameda and also South of the Alameda between NE 21st and NE 19th.

    Maybe some history of the creation of Sabin?

    Thank You, Tony Jenkins

    1. Doug Says:

      Hi Tony. Thanks for dropping by the blog. I will look into the specifics of Sabin and will post a plat map here in the next few days, but wanted to address your question: Alameda was not platted until 1909 and the earliest construction followed in 1910 and 1911. There are earlier houses (1905-1906) in Sabin. Interesting to note that the Vernon neighborhood, just north of Alameda Park across Prescott, was also platted and built before Alameda. Even though they are not part of the “Alameda Park Addition” proper (they are in “Homedale”), the houses on the west side of NE 21st between Fremont and Alameda were built in the 1920s, at the same time as most of the bungalows on the east side of the street were. Stay tuned, I’ll post the plat map soon.

      1. Tony Jenkins Says:

        My house is on the West side of NE 21st near Ridgewood and was built in the “Alameda Park Addition” proper. My deed says so as does the map of the Alameda Park Addition in this blog. Thanks for researching this.

  4. Bob Jensen Says:

    Doug, I have thoroughly enjoyed your website and its links. I grew up at 2415 NE 28th Ave. (near Brazee). I believe our house was built in 1911. My parents moved in in 1952. Us kids were always told the neighborhood was called Dolph Park, but the Portland neighborhoods book doesn’t have that. I know this area is not in Alameda, perhaps Fernwood. Could you point me to a source for learning a little about my old home area? Thanks.

  5. Jerrold Lyle Says:

    I grew up in Alameda. My address was 4204 N.E.32nd Ave. This house was build in 1912 and had two lots. The original oner was Robert Maguire who was a US attorney at the time. The original address was 900E. 32nd North. I studied the history of the home and know much about this area if you want to know more. Jerrold Lyle

    1. Bob Jensen Says:

      My old house at 2415 NE 28th Ave. (formerly 493 E. 28th St. North) is in the Bowering Tract. While this is a bit southwest of your old house, do you have any knowledge about the Bowering Tract? Thanks.

      1. Doug Says:

        Hi Bob. Yes, the Bowerings were a family who lived in the area in the mid-19th Century and received a 320-acre grant of land from the US Government, known as a Donation Land Claim, or DLC. William and Isabella Bowering (married in 1833), and eventually their children John and Marietta, sold off portions of the land over the years. Much of today’s Alameda neighborhood was part of the original Bowering Donation Land Claim. After having a look at the the “Bowering DLC Tract” plat, which was filed with the Multnomah County Surveyor in February 1872, it’s interesting to note the Bowerings platted this small piece of their overall claim long before the grid we know today. Their initial plat was for 12 five-acre lots, and two three-and-one-third acre lots. Mini farmsteads. It’s an interesting shaped plat, long and narrow, and served originally by NE 33rd, which was then simply known as a county road. If you look at all the surrounding plats, it’s clear there were a lot of replats made over time. The Bowering Tract remains a touchstone to our past…

  6. Richard Goodall Says:

    I was delighted to discovery your excellent web site while researching street name changes in Portland.

    My grandfather’s home was located at 301 Glenn Avenue. Can you help me locate this street number on Alameda Park Avenue map? It appears that the numbering got changed as well as the street names.

    R. Goodall

    1. Doug Says:

      Hi Richard. Thanks for dropping by the blog…glad you enjoyed it.

      I’ve examined the early addresses on Glenn and all of the resources I have suggest that the Glenn (now 32nd Place) addresses run from 476 Glenn (now 2316 NE 32nd Place), which is just north of Thompson, to 1150 Glenn (now 5435 NE 32nd Place). Tell me a bit more about where he lived and let’s see if we can sleuth this out.

      -Doug

  7. Mike Says:

    Hi Doug,

    You’ve got a great website here. I’m trying to find the original address of 3222 NE 37th – it was built in 1928. One of the Sanborn maps covers 1924-1928, but I’m having trouble locating the area online.

    Any help would be much appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Mike

    1. Doug Says:

      Hi Mike. Thanks for visiting the website. I’ve sent you a detailed response by e-mail. I know the house and am familiar with several others in that area…

      -Doug

  8. steven koch Says:

    The University of Oregon has a research paper in the School of Architecture library on the hill know back in the day as “dirt hill”. I will see if I can find a link online and post it. As a kid I remember playing on the hill before they built the stairs.

    SKoch

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